When injustice becomes law, rebellion becomes duty
invaderxan:

Neil deGrasse Tyson telling it like it is.

invaderxan:

Neil deGrasse Tyson telling it like it is.

Methinks…

resultsofapathy:

Canadians should wake the fuck up.

I mean honestly, I may only be 23, but I am really really afraid of where this country is heading under the un-leadership of the great asshole Stephen Harper.

I mean who the fuck does he think he is, I really hope he dies in a fire.  Do you hear that CSIS?  I Really hope, he dies in a fire.

I digress.  Canadians, read the fucking news, and not the indoctrinated news, read some real news.  Fact check your sources and write your fucking politicians.

Stop being fools.  We have an opportunity here to change things for the better and show the world that a 1st world nation can be not assholes.

Anyway, that’s the end of that rant.

Allow me to continue than, friend.

How deep does this go? Oil sands, pipelines, new military hardware we don’t need, the war on drugs, the war on science, austerity measures, apartheid against the indigenous peoples of Canada, attacking the Internet and it’s users, the list goes on and on and on and on……

climateadaptation:

Boron-treated carbon nanotubes soak up oil from water repeatedly

Researchers at Rice University and Penn State University have discovered that adding a dash of boron to carbon while creating nanotubes turns them into solid, spongy, reusable blocks that have an astounding ability to absorb oil spilled in water. […]

The blocks are both superhydrophobic (they hate water, so they float really well) and oleophilic (they love oil). The nanosponges, which are more than 99 percent air, also conduct electricity and can easily be manipulated with magnets. […] He then put a match to the material, burned off the oil and returned the sponge to the water to absorb more. The robust sponge can be used repeatedly and stands up to abuse; he said a sample remained elastic after about 10,000 compressions in the lab. The sponge can also store the oil for later retrieval, he said.

“These samples can be made pretty large and can be easily scaled up,” said Hashim, holding a half-inch square block of billions of nanotubes. “They’re super-low density, so the available volume is large. That’s why the uptake of oil can be so high.” He said the sponges described in the paper can absorb more than a hundred times their weight in oil. […]

“Oil-spill remediation and environmental cleanup are just the beginning of how useful these new nanotube materials could be,” added. “For example, we could use these materials to make more efficient and lighter batteries. We could use them as scaffolds for bone-tissue regeneration. We even could impregnate the nanotube sponge with polymers to fabricate robust and light composites for the automobile and plane industries.” […]

[via] [more] [paper]

Mikash - For Science, mother-fucker! This is actually really amazing, and might just save the Gulf of Mexico, if people want to follow through with this.

sagansense:

unknownskywalker:

Mooning Mercury
This discovery image provides the first evidence that Mercury has a small natural satellite or moon. Visible as a small bright spot in this image taken in March 31, 2012 by MESSENGER, the moon is approximately 70 meters in diameter and orbits Mercury at a mean distance of 14,300 km.
A proposal to name the moon “Caduceus,” after the staff carried by the Roman god Mercury, has been submitted by the MESSENGER team to the International Astronomical Union, the body responsible for assigning names to celestial objects.
This discovery presents an unprecedented opportunity for a return of samples from the Mercury system. In an emergency meeting yesterday evening The MESSENGER team took a unanimous decision to use the remaining propellant to crash MESSENGER into Caduceus. With the right timing and trajectory, MESSENGER will impart just enough momentum to the moon to break it free of Mercury’s gravity well and set it on an Earth-crossing trajectory suitable for recovery as a Mercury meteorite.
If Caduceus is successfully released from the pull of Mercury and placed on a course to reach Earth, we can expect the moon to arrive at Earth by 2014. The MESSENGER team have designed a trajectory that will bring the moon to Earth at a remote location on the Wilkes Land ice sheet in Antarctica within reach for retrieval by the scientific staff at the U.S.-operated McMurdo Station.

Make sure you read this twice then show it to a friend & respect the brilliance that is science.

sagansense:

unknownskywalker:

Mooning Mercury

This discovery image provides the first evidence that Mercury has a small natural satellite or moon. Visible as a small bright spot in this image taken in March 31, 2012 by MESSENGER, the moon is approximately 70 meters in diameter and orbits Mercury at a mean distance of 14,300 km.

A proposal to name the moon “Caduceus,” after the staff carried by the Roman god Mercury, has been submitted by the MESSENGER team to the International Astronomical Union, the body responsible for assigning names to celestial objects.

This discovery presents an unprecedented opportunity for a return of samples from the Mercury system. In an emergency meeting yesterday evening The MESSENGER team took a unanimous decision to use the remaining propellant to crash MESSENGER into Caduceus. With the right timing and trajectory, MESSENGER will impart just enough momentum to the moon to break it free of Mercury’s gravity well and set it on an Earth-crossing trajectory suitable for recovery as a Mercury meteorite.

If Caduceus is successfully released from the pull of Mercury and placed on a course to reach Earth, we can expect the moon to arrive at Earth by 2014. The MESSENGER team have designed a trajectory that will bring the moon to Earth at a remote location on the Wilkes Land ice sheet in Antarctica within reach for retrieval by the scientific staff at the U.S.-operated McMurdo Station.

Make sure you read this twice then show it to a friend & respect the brilliance that is science.

A decade ago, biologist Irving Weissman of the Stanford University School of Medicine in Palo Alto, California, discovered that leukemia cells produce higher levels of a protein called CD47 than do healthy cells. CD47, he and other scientists found, is also displayed on healthy blood cells; it’s a marker that blocks the immune system from destroying them as they circulate. Cancers take advantage of this flag to trick the immune system into ignoring them. In the past few years, Weissman’s lab showed that blocking CD47 with an antibody cured some cases of lymphomas and leukemias in mice by stimulating the immune system to recognize the cancer cells as invaders. Now, he and colleagues have shown that the CD47-blocking antibody may have a far wider impact than just blood cancers.

"What we’ve shown is that CD47 isn’t just important on leukemias and lymphomas," says Weissman. "It’s on every single human primary tumor that we tested." Moreover, Weissman’s lab found that cancer cells always had higher levels of CD47 than did healthy cells. How much CD47 a tumor made could predict the survival odds of a patient.

Ahh, but it’s a cure, and not a treatment, so I wouldn’t get too excited about this. As long as Big Pharma exists, we’ll all be sick as we let ourselves become.

Adam Savage - The Reason Rally

thequantumlife:

A Scottish start-up has figured out how to make biofuel—and other useful stuff—out of whiskey distillery waste.


Celtic Renewables has figured out how to ferment whiskey waste and turn it into biofuel, along with two other useful products.





Here’s how it works: To make Scotch whiskey, you take barley, separate out the sugar, add water and yeast, and ferment it. The result is similar to beer. The next step is to distill the alcohol from that beer in pots. Set it to age in wooden casks, and a few months later, you have whiskey.
The problem is that the process creates a lot of byproduct: First there are the remains of the barley, called draff. And when you distill the alcohol, you’re left with a liquid called pot ale, which is hard to dispose of because it contains biological components that can acidify ecosystems, along with traces of copper that are leached from the pots. Celtic Renewables makes a soup out of the pot ale and draff. Then—through a fuel-making fermentation process that was developed during the leadup to World War I but fell out of favor when it couldn’t compete with petroleum—the company converts the stuff into biobutanol fuel, animal feed, and acetone.



Mikash - AWESOME!

thequantumlife:

A Scottish start-up has figured out how to make biofuel—and other useful stuff—out of whiskey distillery waste.

Celtic Renewables has figured out how to ferment whiskey waste and turn it into biofuel, along with two other useful products.

Here’s how it works: To make Scotch whiskey, you take barley, separate out the sugar, add water and yeast, and ferment it. The result is similar to beer. The next step is to distill the alcohol from that beer in pots. Set it to age in wooden casks, and a few months later, you have whiskey.

The problem is that the process creates a lot of byproduct: First there are the remains of the barley, called draff. And when you distill the alcohol, you’re left with a liquid called pot ale, which is hard to dispose of because it contains biological components that can acidify ecosystems, along with traces of copper that are leached from the pots. Celtic Renewables makes a soup out of the pot ale and draff. Then—through a fuel-making fermentation process that was developed during the leadup to World War I but fell out of favor when it couldn’t compete with petroleum—the company converts the stuff into biobutanol fuel, animal feed, and acetone.

Mikash - AWESOME!

"The bottom line is this: increasing the risk of arrest and the likelihood of going to prison produces modest reductions in property and violent crime, but increasing the length of prison sentences exerts no effect at all," Dr Weatherburn said.

"The question most offenders are asking is, am I going to get caught? They’re not sitting down and thinking, well if I am caught will I go to jail and if I do how long will I go for?

"The only question in the front of their minds, many of them not being great long-term planners, is what’s the chance of being caught if I do this?"

Dr Weatherburn says the study found a booming economy is the surest way to reduce crime.

He says a 10 per cent increase in household income produced an estimated 19 per cent reduction in property crime over the long term and a 15 per cent cut in violent crime.

Ah, but the government’s plan is not to help people get more income, it’s to trap them in slave labor jobs. It’s a real shame we aren’t a country founded on science and research for our laws. Instead, we end up in a place governed by the gut.

ghoulinterrupted:

eddellamorte:

right on!

oh lord


Mikash - Like a boss

ghoulinterrupted:

eddellamorte:

right on!

oh lord

Mikash - Like a boss